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PATTERNS IN NATURE

Patterns in nature are visible regularities of form found in the natural world. These patterns recur in different contexts and can sometimes be modelled mathematically. Natural patterns include symmetries, trees, spirals, meanders, waves, foams, tessellations, cracks and stripes. (Wikipedia)

The above photograph was taken of tidal water on sand. This is a once only photograph as the next time the tide recedes the pattern and depending on weather, the colour may change also.

You may notice that the texture in the above photograph taken in Alaska, is very smooth and this is because for thousands of years, this rock has had tons of ice in the form of a glacier sliding across it and in it’s travel has managed to form this beautiful pattern.

Once again we have pattern in rock, this time it’s sandstone and over time, nature through compression, water and wind has formed a natural pattern.

The above image was taken of a section of a leaf which in itself was not all that spectacular. However, by photographing a certain portion it became a contemporary piece of photographic art and if framed, could look quite presentable on a living room wall or as a pattern in material.

This last photograph is yet another example of a natural pattern formed by nature, this time in the bark of a tree.

I have tried to illustrate in this post that there are natural patterns everywhere around you whether it is on a beach, a forrest, the sky or anywhere else nature can be seen and appreciated.

Stay safe and enjoy your surroundings.

My photographs can also be found on Instagram – jimmybee2

Jimmy Bee

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AMAZING!

Photograph courtesy of Gavin Becker a friend and riding buddy.

You may well ask “Why is this amazing?”

It is amazing because for the last 10 years, I have been cycling along this trail once a fortnight and have never witnessed this phenomenon. Hundreds of cone shaped spider webs on a patch of low lying reeds on the shoreline. The trees on the top left of the photograph are mangroves and on the other side is Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia.

Pt. Halloran conservation area
Pt. Halloran looking towards Victoria Point.

In it’s own right, this trail between Cleveland and Redland Bay is a very pretty ride where, one minute you can be riding in a forest and the next, alongside water lapping the foreshore.

Pt. Halloran under fog.

This morning however, riding conditions were very different, the area was enveloped in heavy fog making riding a slow process. It is quite unusual for the area to experience fog that alone heavy fog and it got me thinking whether this change in weather triggered the phenomenon shown in the photograph. If anybody out there can set me straight, I would be pleased to hear from you.

My mind went into heavy overdrive due to the fact that I have been riding this route for over ten years and in all that time there could have been a colony of living things with hundred of inhabitants going about their business less than a metre away and I was totally unaware of it, “how deaf we hear, how blind we see”. That is what I found to be so amazing!

Be aware of and remain inspired by nature.

If you have the time please see Jimmy Bee 2 on Instagram for more photographs of various subjects.

Jimmy Bee

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SHARK AHOY

“But as they say about sharks, it’s not the ones you see that you have to worry about, it’s the ones you don’t see….

David Blame
Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by author.

One morning recently, I received a phone call from my friend who said “Jimmy, grab your camera and come over here, I have a school of sharks feeding on bait fish just out the front.

Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by author.

Wow! what a sight, I used to kayak in these waters and never sighted a shark, I sometimes felt a bump on the bottom of my kayak, especially in the canals but nothing more. These were Bull sharks and they were swimming and hunting bait fish in knee high water. I was intrigued to watch how the pups (younger sharks) stayed up one end whilst the larger sharks acted like sheep/cattle dogs and herded the school of bait fish and drove them to the waiting hungry pups. They would then fan out and collect the bait fish that had escaped bringing them back together in a tight school before herding them back in the opposite direction to the waiting pups. This went on for more than an hour.

Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by the Author.

The Bull shark is not indigenous to Australia as a similar species can be found in Zambia and is known as “The Zambi”, also in Lake Nicaragua where it is known as the “Lake Nicaragua shark” and probably a lot of other places. It is quite unusual in that it has the ability to survive in brackish water and therefore can be found quite away upstream in rivers, e.g. in the United States, they have been known to have travelled up the Mississippi River some 1100 km from the ocean.

This shark is stocky in build and grows to a length of 3.4 m in coastal open water but considerably smaller in rivers and estuaries where they are recorded as growing to 2.25 m depending on sex. They have a bluntly rounded snout and small yellow eyes. Their colour ranges from pale to very dark grey with white underbelly.

Four bull sharks were tagged and released in the Richmond River at Ballina on Thursday 23 February 2017.
Article by Alison Paterson , Northern Star newspaper, Lismore, NSW. Australia

The big question is…..Are they man-eaters? Well!….. they are extremely aggressive and can justifiably claim to be the world’s most dangerous shark and probably responsible for more deaths than they are credited for, particularly in shallow warm coastal waters, estuaries and rivers. As you can see in the above photographs, these shark are very close to the shore and in knee high water. The larger sharks would have been at least 2 m long. There appears to be a myth out there that sharks only feed at dawn and dusk. I can tell you that these sharks were filling their bellies around 11.30 in the morning, so I for one wouldn’t like to test that theory. On the positive side, there is a lot of water between sharks, so the chances of being attacked is quite minimal.

For more information you may like to follow up with:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bull_shark

and

https://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Find+out+about/Animals+of+Queensland/Fishes/Sharks+and+rays/Bull+Shark#.XVUT8i1L2w6

I thank both organisations and hope this article has been informative.

Live in the moment and stay safe.

Jimmy Bee

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NORTHERN FOOTPRINT

“Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time.”

Steven Wright

A walk on the north side of town, from the Spit Bridge to Manly, Sydney, Australia

Every walk starts with just one tiny footprint. It’s where that footprint takes you that matters.

The Spit to Manly walk.

When I started this walk I wondered who had walked this area before. I don’t mean the manufactured walking trail but the entire area between the Spit Bridge and Manly. Bush walkers perhaps, convicts, early explorers? Actually, I was thinking of the Indigenous people of this land who hunted and gathered food here for thousands of years and we know that they were here and there were many of them. I wonder what they thought as they saw the first sailing vessels coming through the heads. The surprise and wonderment at the garments and uniforms of the first officers and sailors on landing.

Seaforth, Sydney, N.S.W.
Seaforth, Sydney, N.S.W.

Some of the harbour side beaches throw the most spectacular patterns in the water and you can see just how clean and clear the water is which brings me back to thinking about the aboriginal people who lived on these shores and what a life style they must have enjoyed with plentiful fresh water, native animals, birds and an abundance of fish and crustaceons to feast on, a temperate climate with lots of sunshine, life must have been very good.

The above view was our introduction to our walk and we couldn’t have wished for better weather and couldn’t wait to see what we had in front of us.

Our next location was Clortarf where we were greeted by this natural sculpture in sandstone.

Is the above view for real? Is it some mystical bottom dwelling sea creature from the bottom of Sydney Harbour that I have accidentally photographed? or is it an illusion produced by the water passing over a rather large submerged rock? You be the judge!

This is a view across Sydney Harbour looking from Clontarf to South Head at the entrance to Sydney harbour. If you read my post on the walk from Watsons Bay to Bondi Beach, the land depicted in the above photograph is the subject of the article. I may be biased but I think it is quite spectacular. The ferry you can see in the photo, is heading to Manly from Circular Quay and it would be this ferry that you would catch to start the walk from Manly to The Spit.

As we passed through Balgowla Heights I was attracted to the beautiful native flora which goes to show you that there is more to this walk than awesome harbour views.

At the top of this photograph is North Head at the entrance to Sydney harbour. This headland used to be an army installation and out of bounds to the general public, but in recent times it has been turned into Sydney Harbour National Park and can be walked as an extension to the Spit to Manly walk.

When we reached this spot, I knew that we were nearing the end of our walk. Our destination, Manly, is a little to the right of centre in the above photo. It was an enjoyable walk, not too difficult with ample interesting coves and beaches at which to stop and admire the panoramic views of Sydney Harbour. We continued our walk to the ocean side through the pedestrian only Corso ( 5 mins,) where we had an ice cream before catching a ferry back to Circular Quay and a bus to Bondi Beach. All in all an awesome day out.

Information:

Distance: 10 km – one way

Gradient: Moderate

Walk time: 3-5 hrs. depending on fitness and how many stops you make on the way.

If you are planning on staying in Sydney and intend playing the tourist, I would suggest buying an Opal Card which will cover all public transp

Just keep walking,

Jimmy Bee,

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DESIGN by Monsieur Naturel

“What is art monsieur, but nature concentrated”…..Honore de Balzac

The above images were captured by the author at different times.

Art to me is nature, design to me is art au natural. It is the randomness in the placement of colour and how it is applied. First nation artists tend to depict a similar concept whether by design or intuition, I’m not quite sure. I am not an artist in the true sense but my mind is receptive to design in nature and I try to capture it through photography wherever I travel.

The above collage, is of patterns in different forms of rock. I have found that the best patterns form in sandstone and granite. Some of these images have been captured on sandstone buildings, the Port of Adelaide in South Australia being one location, North Haven also in South Australia, another.

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”

…..Albert Einstein

Bark pattern

Here we have two more patterns, from two separate locations but this time they are in the form of bark from a tree and can be described as art au natural, the same as the rocks in the collage, which are art au natural as well. The art of nature is all around us whether it be in the city or the country. It is there to be admired but sadly, people walk past it every day and fail to see it for what it is.

Become more aware of your surroundings and you will be amazed at what you will see.

Stay safe,

Jimmy Bee

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A VACATION BY THE SEA

“A simple life is good with me. I don’t need a whole lot. For me, a T-shirt, a pair of shorts, barefoot on a beach and I’m happy.”…..Yanni

https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/beach

At 6 am in the morning, Burleigh Heads, Qld. is alive with joggers, cyclists, walkers, exercise junkies and of course surfers both amateur and pro. Old men, in not so flash gear and younger ones in colourful T-shirts and board shorts. Females, young of course, flashing the flesh in bright bikinis, shorts and tops. There are the newly arrived with their lilly white skin and those who have been here awhile with their beautiful tans.

On most days you are greeted with the spectacle of board surfers both pro. and practiced amateurs putting on a display riding the breaks.

When I am there, I’m usually up at day break with a hot coffee in hand and watching these guys have fun. What a way to start the day, completely rested and relaxed and looking forward to breakfast which can be had at any number of good restaurants in Burleigh Heads.

The above photograph was taken of the main beach looking north towards Surfers Paradise. This strip of sand runs for as far as one can see and accommodates a number of patrolled beaches and is known as the Gold Coast of Australia. On a hot day in the middle of summer, these beaches are full of people just wanting to bare the body beautiful to the sun, cool down in the surf break or body surf the waves. As well as holiday makers, a lot of Brisbane residents make the day trip as it is just a little over a hundred kilometres.

Of course, it is not all about beaches and surfing, family picnics are popular with locals arriving early in the morning just to reserve a good spot in John Laws park beside the rolling surf and stay for the entire day and sometimes well into the night. For those who like walking, there are plenty of good walks including Burleigh Hill, which is a good heart starter after having a night out. Nights here are pretty much alive as well with a number of good restaurants and bars to keep you entertained and it’s not too far down the road to try your luck at the casino, and for those with a more refined taste, there is a good performing arts centre to catch a live performance. Public transport is good and it is not that difficult to hire a Uber. It’s all….just good.

Christmas is a fabulous time to be at Burleigh Heads, especially when it is full moon. Be warned though, it would be wise to obtain your accommodation early if planning to holiday here at Christmas and don’t forget the bubbly.

https://www.destinationgoldcoast.com/corporate

Cheers, stay safe and keep well,

Jimmy Bee

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THE DISAPPEARING SUN

“My dream date would be a hike through the woods followed by an outdoor picnic, followed by a glass of wine at sunset. Heaven!”…..Nina Agdal

https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/sunset
Image of the sun receding from the western sky at Burleigh Heads, Queensland, Australia was taken by the author.

“Natures way of painting the perfect ending to a perfect day.”…..JPB

Having had a wonderful day and now sitting on the balcony with a glass of red wine in hand, chatting to friends and watching the sun go down was quite a fulfilling moment.

Live for the moment.

Jimmy Bee