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WATER COLORS

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself”….George Bernard Shaw

If global warming continues and I fervently believe it will, we may have to rely more on the sea to produce our food. The above photograph was taken looking into a shallow rock pool at the plant life below. It would be good to know whether this plant life, which could be a renewable resource, is edible. No! I didn’t try it, I leave that sort of thing to the scientists or the guinea pigs.

As I was walking along the foreshore one day, the tide was coming in and there were a small number of fingerlings swimming. I photographed them and the above photo was the result. The fingerlings were opaque and not being a professional photographer as such, I have no idea how they represent in this photograph as a shade of purple and white.

The above photograph was taken of sea water rushing in and over a shallow crater in the rock I was standing on and I thought at the time that it made an interesting pattern.I should imagine that this pattern, as mixed as it is, would be extremely difficult to replicate in a painting. If nothing else, it makes a good talking point.

I’ve always been fascinated to see the result of light hitting water and the resultant picture it creates and if I was to come back in an hour’s time, the above picture would have changed dramatically, particularly if the weather changes. Perhaps that is why it is called a moment in time.

There is something very peaceful in sitting and watching the tide flow into the shoreline. Watching the play of colours on the surface and listening to the rippling of the water as it flows gently over the rocks.

This photograph is a good example of how you can turn something very simple into an abstract or decorative art piece simply by manipulating the colour. It is not necessary to capture a panorama to make a visual statement. Sometimes, simplicity speaks the loudest.

Enjoy what you do and do it well.

Jimmy Bee

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NATURAL PATTERNS – 2

Image of the natural patterns of these stalagmites in a cave captured by the author

“If we make a fly-on-the-wall review of our history and connect the significant scenarios from our memory, we can develop a comprehensive pattern of our identity that throws a whirl of light on the secreted framework of our life. (“Labyrinth of the mind”)” 
― Erik Pevernagie

The above quote was presented by Good Reads – https://www.goodreads.com/quotes

The author captured this natural pattern on the shell of a green turtle.

“Like the turtle’s shell, the sense of self serves as a shield against stimulation and as a burden which limits mobility into possibly dangerous areas. The turtle rarely has to think about what’s on the other side of his shell; whatever it is, it can’t hurt him, can’t even touch him. So, too, adults insist on the shell of a consistent self for themselves and their children and appreciate turtles for friends; they wish to be protected from being hurt or touched or confused or having to think. If a man can rely on consistency, he can afford not to notice people after the first few times. But I imagined a world in which each individual might be about to play the lover, the benefactor, the sponger, the attacker, the friend: and once known as one of the next day he might yet be anything. Would we pay attention to this person? Would life be boring? Would life be livable? I saw then clearly for the first time that the fear of failure keeps us huddled in the cave of self – a group of behavior patterns we have mastered and have no intention of risking failure by abandoning.” 

― Luke Rhinehart, The Dice Man

Thanks to Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/quotes
This pattern on a leaf was captured by the author.

Every photographer has his/her niche in life, mine is recognising natural patterns. Yesterday, I was having breakfast when I noticed the plant on the table in front of me. Now that plant has been in that position on the table for a number of weeks and yes, I had noticed the pattern on it’s leaves but yesterday, the sun must have been in the right position as it really exposed the colours and the pattern as I’d not seen it before and of course I couldn’t help but capture the image.

Until next time,

Jimmy Bee

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LAND OF THE BLUE/GREEN ICE

If there is one thing that defines Alaska apart from it’s wilderness, it is it’s magnificent glaciers.“…..JPB

To think that this awesome structure is in constant motion, and has been so for a long, long time with the leading section dying and falling into the sea forming small icebergs,

Hearing and seeing a glacier calve (a large piece of ice breaking away from the leading edge) is an experience I will never forget. There was this almighty roar and as I spun around, I witnessed this large chunk of ice slide into the water and I was lucky enough to capture the above image.

The above image depicts how the ice collects soil and rock and other debris as it slides down the mountain on it’s journey to the sea. One can just imagine that as the ice melts on contact with the water it could reveal the skeletons, tools and weapons of a bygone era. The seabed of the inside passage could make an ideal place to explore, if it hasn’t already been done.

This final image is of the leading edge of an Alaskan Glacier. It would make a fitting ingredient to an exotic cocktail at the Royal Hawaiian, in Honolulu.

I used an Apple SE phone and a Canon G Series camera, both ancient in modern terms but sufficed.

My wife and I travelled the Inside Passage between British Columbia and Alaska on the Crown Princess https://www.princess.com

Cheers,

Jimmy Bee