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PATTERNS IN NATURE

Patterns in nature are visible regularities of form found in the natural world. These patterns recur in different contexts and can sometimes be modelled mathematically. Natural patterns include symmetries, trees, spirals, meanders, waves, foams, tessellations, cracks and stripes. (Wikipedia)

The above photograph was taken of tidal water on sand. This is a once only photograph as the next time the tide recedes the pattern and depending on weather, the colour may change also.

You may notice that the texture in the above photograph taken in Alaska, is very smooth and this is because for thousands of years, this rock has had tons of ice in the form of a glacier sliding across it and in it’s travel has managed to form this beautiful pattern.

Once again we have pattern in rock, this time it’s sandstone and over time, nature through compression, water and wind has formed a natural pattern.

The above image was taken of a section of a leaf which in itself was not all that spectacular. However, by photographing a certain portion it became a contemporary piece of photographic art and if framed, could look quite presentable on a living room wall or as a pattern in material.

This last photograph is yet another example of a natural pattern formed by nature, this time in the bark of a tree.

I have tried to illustrate in this post that there are natural patterns everywhere around you whether it is on a beach, a forrest, the sky or anywhere else nature can be seen and appreciated.

Stay safe and enjoy your surroundings.

My photographs can also be found on Instagram – jimmybee2

Jimmy Bee

Featured

WATER COLORS

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself”….George Bernard Shaw

If global warming continues and I fervently believe it will, we may have to rely more on the sea to produce our food. The above photograph was taken looking into a shallow rock pool at the plant life below. It would be good to know whether this plant life, which could be a renewable resource, is edible. No! I didn’t try it, I leave that sort of thing to the scientists or the guinea pigs.

As I was walking along the foreshore one day, the tide was coming in and there were a small number of fingerlings swimming. I photographed them and the above photo was the result. The fingerlings were opaque and not being a professional photographer as such, I have no idea how they represent in this photograph as a shade of purple and white.

The above photograph was taken of sea water rushing in and over a shallow crater in the rock I was standing on and I thought at the time that it made an interesting pattern.I should imagine that this pattern, as mixed as it is, would be extremely difficult to replicate in a painting. If nothing else, it makes a good talking point.

I’ve always been fascinated to see the result of light hitting water and the resultant picture it creates and if I was to come back in an hour’s time, the above picture would have changed dramatically, particularly if the weather changes. Perhaps that is why it is called a moment in time.

There is something very peaceful in sitting and watching the tide flow into the shoreline. Watching the play of colours on the surface and listening to the rippling of the water as it flows gently over the rocks.

This photograph is a good example of how you can turn something very simple into an abstract or decorative art piece simply by manipulating the colour. It is not necessary to capture a panorama to make a visual statement. Sometimes, simplicity speaks the loudest.

Enjoy what you do and do it well.

Jimmy Bee

SUNSET with a difference!

Clouds come floating into my life no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add colour to my sunset sky.

Rabindranath Tagore, Stray Birds
Photograph of the reverse of a sunset (East rather than West) at Cleveland, Qld. Australia

This photograph was taken of the eastern sky at sunset. I just happened to be on my balcony and I had my phone with me. Even though the light was low I could see the artistic value in the muted colours. It could almost pass for a water colour!….What do you think?

I was so intrigued with these colours, that I googled the following question….”Why does the opposite sky turn pastel during a vivid sunset?” and I found this answer …..

“It is caused when large particles in the lower atmosphere tend to mute and muddy the colours because they absorb more light and scatter all the wavelengths more or less equally, so you don’t get that dramatic filtering effect”

Where I live, we tend to get some beautiful pastel ‘eastern sunsets’ but this is the first time I have encountered something like this.

Jimmy Bee