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AMAZING!

Photograph courtesy of Gavin Becker a friend and riding buddy.

You may well ask “Why is this amazing?”

It is amazing because for the last 10 years, I have been cycling along this trail once a fortnight and have never witnessed this phenomenon. Hundreds of cone shaped spider webs on a patch of low lying reeds on the shoreline. The trees on the top left of the photograph are mangroves and on the other side is Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia.

Pt. Halloran conservation area
Pt. Halloran looking towards Victoria Point.

In it’s own right, this trail between Cleveland and Redland Bay is a very pretty ride where, one minute you can be riding in a forest and the next, alongside water lapping the foreshore.

Pt. Halloran under fog.

This morning however, riding conditions were very different, the area was enveloped in heavy fog making riding a slow process. It is quite unusual for the area to experience fog that alone heavy fog and it got me thinking whether this change in weather triggered the phenomenon shown in the photograph. If anybody out there can set me straight, I would be pleased to hear from you.

My mind went into heavy overdrive due to the fact that I have been riding this route for over ten years and in all that time there could have been a colony of living things with hundred of inhabitants going about their business less than a metre away and I was totally unaware of it, “how deaf we hear, how blind we see”. That is what I found to be so amazing!

Be aware of and remain inspired by nature.

If you have the time please see Jimmy Bee 2 on Instagram for more photographs of various subjects.

Jimmy Bee

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A RITUAL TO BEHOLD

“Ritual cuts through and operates on everything besides the “head” level….Aiden Kelly

Turtles makin little turtles in Moreton Bay, Qld.

The animal kingdom completely ignores humans in the wild. We’re in their territory and they will go about their business where and whenever they like showing not the slightest inhibition what so ever. When the time’s right it just happens. After all, the species must continue.

2 turtles mating off Southern end of Macleay Island, Qld.

I felt quite the voyeur when witnessing the mating antics of these two turtles whilst kayaking off Macleay Island , even though I was the interloper.

Mating turtles in soft focus

This was no quick affair as the ritual went on for some time and I’d wager that the male would have been completely knackered by the time it was over and probably rolled onto his back and went to sleep!

This image bis courtesy of Unsplash free photographs

I have included the above photograph merely to indicate the size of the turtles I photographed in action. They are majestic creatures which unfortunately fall prey not only to nature but also to boat propellers passing above them.

“Despite being protected, dugongs and marine turtles can be legally hunted by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people under section 211 of the Native Title Act 1993, which operates to protect the rights of Indigenous peoples with a native title right to hunt, gather, collect and fish or conduct a cultural or spiritual activity. The traditional or subsistence hunting of dugongs and turtles plays an important social and cultural role for coastal aborigines in many parts of northern Australia and the meat provides a source of protein for these communities.” For further reference see link below – https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/is-it-legal-to-hunt-protected-species-such-as-marine-turtles-and-dugongs/

C’est la vie,

Jimmy Bee

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SHARK AHOY

“But as they say about sharks, it’s not the ones you see that you have to worry about, it’s the ones you don’t see….

David Blame
Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by author.

One morning recently, I received a phone call from my friend who said “Jimmy, grab your camera and come over here, I have a school of sharks feeding on bait fish just out the front.

Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by author.

Wow! what a sight, I used to kayak in these waters and never sighted a shark, I sometimes felt a bump on the bottom of my kayak, especially in the canals but nothing more. These were Bull sharks and they were swimming and hunting bait fish in knee high water. I was intrigued to watch how the pups (younger sharks) stayed up one end whilst the larger sharks acted like sheep/cattle dogs and herded the school of bait fish and drove them to the waiting hungry pups. They would then fan out and collect the bait fish that had escaped bringing them back together in a tight school before herding them back in the opposite direction to the waiting pups. This went on for more than an hour.

Bull sharks off Cleveland Point, Queensland, Australia. Image taken by the Author.

The Bull shark is not indigenous to Australia as a similar species can be found in Zambia and is known as “The Zambi”, also in Lake Nicaragua where it is known as the “Lake Nicaragua shark” and probably a lot of other places. It is quite unusual in that it has the ability to survive in brackish water and therefore can be found quite away upstream in rivers, e.g. in the United States, they have been known to have travelled up the Mississippi River some 1100 km from the ocean.

This shark is stocky in build and grows to a length of 3.4 m in coastal open water but considerably smaller in rivers and estuaries where they are recorded as growing to 2.25 m depending on sex. They have a bluntly rounded snout and small yellow eyes. Their colour ranges from pale to very dark grey with white underbelly.

Four bull sharks were tagged and released in the Richmond River at Ballina on Thursday 23 February 2017.
Article by Alison Paterson , Northern Star newspaper, Lismore, NSW. Australia

The big question is…..Are they man-eaters? Well!….. they are extremely aggressive and can justifiably claim to be the world’s most dangerous shark and probably responsible for more deaths than they are credited for, particularly in shallow warm coastal waters, estuaries and rivers. As you can see in the above photographs, these shark are very close to the shore and in knee high water. The larger sharks would have been at least 2 m long. There appears to be a myth out there that sharks only feed at dawn and dusk. I can tell you that these sharks were filling their bellies around 11.30 in the morning, so I for one wouldn’t like to test that theory. On the positive side, there is a lot of water between sharks, so the chances of being attacked is quite minimal.

For more information you may like to follow up with:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bull_shark

and

https://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Find+out+about/Animals+of+Queensland/Fishes/Sharks+and+rays/Bull+Shark#.XVUT8i1L2w6

I thank both organisations and hope this article has been informative.

Live in the moment and stay safe.

Jimmy Bee